Topical intranasal corticosteroid therapy in rhinitis

Initially, 1 to mg/kg IV. If ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia persist, additional to mg/kg IV doses can be given every 5 to 10 minutes up to a total loading dose of 3 mg/kg. The same dose may be given via the intraosseous route when IV access is not available. There is inadequate evidence to support the routine use of lidocaine after cardiac arrest; however, the initiation or continuation of lidocaine may be considered after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) from cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. If a maintenance lidocaine infusion is warranted for an individual patient, administer 1 to 4 mg/minute (30 to 50 mcg/kg/minute) IV. Use lower infusion rates for patients who are elderly, have heart failure or hepatic disease, or are debilitated. Lidocaine is considered an alternative antiarrhythmic to amiodarone for this indication, particularly when amiodarone is not available. Lidocaine is convenient to administer but is not as effective as amiodarone for improving ROSC or survival to hospital admission among adult patients with VF refractory to a shock and epinephrine. Neither drug has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge in cardiac arrest patients with VF.

At the Everest base camp medical clinic, conditions are cold and hostile, nearly every case is urgent, and routine treatment we rely on in urban hospital environments is sometimes impossible to carry out.  Having the ability to administer medications intranasally, obviating the need for IV access (and thawing out of our IV fluids!) can be not only an easier and timelier solution, but downright lifesaving!  In our recent 2008 season, our staff had the opportunity to treat a brisk nosebleed patient by administering intranasal oxymetazoline and lidocaine to facilitate insertion of a posterior packing device.   We have our nasal drug delivery systems at the ready to administer midazolam, metoclopramide, glucagon, naloxone and opiates if the need arises as well... Luanne Freer, MD -  Medical Director of Everest Base camp, Medical Director Yellowstone .

In 1986 an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed that . health food stores were selling dried coca leaves to be prepared as an infusion as "Health Inca Tea." [26] While the packaging claimed it had been "decocainized", no such process had actually taken place. The article stated that drinking two cups of the tea per day gave a mild stimulation , increased heart rate , and mood elevation, and the tea was essentially harmless. Despite this, the DEA seized several shipments in Hawaii , Chicago , Georgia , and several locations on the East Coast of the United States , and the product was removed from the shelves.

Topical intranasal corticosteroid therapy in rhinitis

topical intranasal corticosteroid therapy in rhinitis

Media:

topical intranasal corticosteroid therapy in rhinitistopical intranasal corticosteroid therapy in rhinitistopical intranasal corticosteroid therapy in rhinitistopical intranasal corticosteroid therapy in rhinitistopical intranasal corticosteroid therapy in rhinitis

http://buy-steroids.org